David To

Excellence in Teaching
CHEP Status: Active
CHEP Since: 03/05/2020

Badge Evidence | Completed Courses (4 Hours Each)

This course is designed to give you a clear and practical understanding of the federal and state regulatory standards that govern the conduct of your organization and correspondingly underlay the performance of your job. The course also includes The Standards of Responsible Conduct and Transparency adhered to by our institution. The purpose of the course is not to train you to be a regulatory expert, but to provide the information you need to do or say the right thing when interacting with prospective students and students, as well as the consequences of doing or saying the wrong thing whether by mistake or with intent. More importantly, the course emphasizes that Doing the Right Thing is more than compliance. Doing the Right Thing supports Our Mission and Values. It ensures that we provide an environment of trust where prospective students receive the information they need to make informed decisions about their education. In short, it helps us help our students change their lives.
This is a private course intended for associates employed by Concorde Career Colleges.
This course provides an introduction to the concept and philosophy of active learning, and describes a variety of methods to help instructors "activ-ate" their class. The course includes active learning examples that utilize both critical and analytical thinking skills. We also identify the risks that may discourage instructors from using active learning strategies and offer suggestions for managing them. A three-step method is suggested for developing an active lesson, and a comprehensive model is offered as a guide for creative active learning strategies.
This course compares and contrasts four styles of classroom management. The course includes "virtual visits" to animated classrooms where participants observe four instructors who exhibit different management styles. The style that is preferred by most students is identified and described, and suggestions are offered on how instructors can modify their personal style to increase their effectiveness. A four-step model for developing successful classroom management strategies is presented and is followed by a discussion of a practical, behavioral approach to classroom management. Characteristics that foster good discipline in the educational institution and in the classroom are listed and explained, and tips are offered that can improve both institution-wide and classroom discipline. Finally, a number of scenarios involving common discipline problems are described.
The majority of careers require the ability to think critically and problem solve at one level or another. Employers seek individuals who can think independently, propose solutions, and solve problems. The content in this course provides the foundation for critical thinking and demonstrates how people with different interests, abilities, and aptitudes approach problem solving. The course covers the different kinds of intelligence and how they impact critical thinking, for a broader understanding of how people process solutions to problems. It concludes with step-by-step instructions for helping students develop and refine their own critical thinking skills.
This course will provide you with a basic overview of the background and history of an innovative instructional method called Adaptive Learning (AL). AL is growing in popularity and differs from traditional educational methods as it focuses on individualized, personalized instruction for everyone. With the rise of technology, AL has a definite place in education. This course discusses the background, importance, issues, attitude changes, implementation and future of AL. The advantages outweigh any disadvantages as AL can help create individualized instruction and increase student success.
This course will provide you with a basic overview of the background of an innovative instructional strategy called the Flipped Classroom. This instructional strategy is gaining popularity and differs from traditional instructional strategies. This course will discuss the background, driving factors, benefits, barriers, theoretical grounding, how to prepare to flip your classroom, and the components of the Flipped Classroom. The impact on student learning will also be discussed in addition to instructor preparation and the future of the Flipped Classroom.
As students from different generations are enrolling in colleges today, instructors are presented with the challenge of how to engage, instruct and relate to these multigenerational learners. This course gives profiles of different generational learners and how they engage in the learning process. Content is shared on how to relate to learners of the different generations and how to use students’ life experiences as learning opportunities. As technology is an essential part of instructional delivery, strategies are given for building on the abilities of multigenerational students to use social networks, portable media (given the parameters of school policy), and personal interaction. In addition, instructors are given methods that can be used to help students develop the critical thinking and interpersonal skills needed for career success.
Career education programs prepare students to perform job tasks successfully in their chosen trade or profession. Providing opportunities beyond traditional quizzes and exams allows students to demonstrate and assess these skills and aids in this preparation. This course focuses on how you, the instructor, can identify and implement alternative assessments that support expected course outcomes and allow students to demonstrate their level of competency for a skill or task.
Emotional Intelligence (EI) is an increasingly important field of study. The purpose of this course is to explore the relevancy of emotional intelligence in learning; and how understanding the importance of emotional intelligence supports student success. While instructors are more aware now of the various forms of intelligence, emotional intelligence has been undervalued in the past as a vital form of intelligence. Indeed, emotionally intelligent students may provide insight and application of knowledge in new and informative ways which can have positive impact on their learning progression and success.
Did you ever hear that we only use about 10% of our brains? Were you ever told that you are more right-brained or left-brained? Did you know that males and females learn differently as a result of differences in their brains? Did you know that people have different learning styles? Did you ever hear that you retain more of what you do or see than of what you read or hear? If you answered "yes" to any of these questions, you have experienced a "myth-understanding." The purpose of this course is to explain the background and truth about these myth-understandings that pervade much of the popular literature to this day. All persons who are involved in the education of others must guard against these myths and ensure that they do not influence their professional practices. Note: Many learning theories have been developed that represent the efforts of researchers with different perspectives on how individuals develop and learn. As within any field, facts and myths may be driven by controversial opinions and philosophies that need to be considered by individuals engaged in professional development.
Technology plays an important role in today's classroom experience. But technology must be used in a way that is useful and beneficial to learning, and will help you to meet your course objectives. This course will describe the features and benefits of using electronic equipment in the career college classroom and the pros and cons for the student and the instructor. Best practices for using electronic assessment and grading tools, as well as software and communications tools, are discussed. In addition, this course will explore strategies for using electronic teaching resources.
Have you ever seen your students falling asleep in class? Have they been less than excited to learn medical terminology? In this course you will discover ways to teach medical terminology that keep your students interested, attentive, and highly engaged in the critical concepts and applications they need to know. Learn to use these active methods, as well as the reasons behind them, and watch your student success rates increase as you adapt and apply new methods to your medical terminology classes.

Please note that ED310 presents learning activities that are applicable to the on-campus classroom or lab. It is not designed for instructors who teach Medical Terminology in the online environment.

Have you been frustrated in your allied health classes when students don't "get it"? Have you tried repeatedly to teach a difficult student and it didn’t seem to work? Sometimes it is a difference in learning styles that creates this misunderstanding. In this themed course, you will learn the eight different learning styles of your health students as well as how to teach to them in a variety of practical ways that are fast, easy and effective. This course follows an interesting "fairy tale format," with several characters you will meet here and may see in your classroom.
This course will inform you about the purpose of rubrics and will provide you with the techniques to develop rubrics as an assessment tool for student performance, processes and products. This course will explore types of rubrics, the role rubrics play in assessment, as well as the use of rubrics in evaluating elements of your online course to ensure your course is truly student-centered.
This course will provide you with a basic overview of the background and history of the popular instructional method called active learning. This method differs from traditional educational methods such as the lecture model. Active learning has a definite place in education especially in the online learning environments. It is used to support teaching outcomes like critical thinking skills, interpersonal skills and knowledge acquisition that all instructors wish for their students. However, active learning it calls for a change of attitude on the part of students and the instructor in order to be successful. But the advantages far outweigh the disadvantages as it can make students enthusiastic about learning. Learn about this brave new world of teaching and learning for the next generation.
This course will provide you with strategies and techniques to immerse students in an interactive environment that will incorporate gaming and simulations to introduce, engage, and reinforce online learning. This course will begin with definitions of gaming and simulations as a tool for online learning and will provide guidance to evaluate, implement, and assess the effectiveness of games.
How many times have we said “if we’d only known” as a student walks out the door? No one starts classes planning to fail, but unfortunately problems do arise that present barriers to success. Students are good at identifying these problems blocking their path to success, but they frequently don’t have adequate problem solving and communication skills needed to overcome these problems. This course looks at the effect of stress on attrition, the use of tools to identify and help students at risk, and how to develop an institutional culture that shares responsibility for student success across the entire organization.