peter holtmann

Excellence in Teaching
CHEP Status: Active
CHEP Since: 09/30/2021

Badge Evidence | Completed Courses (4 Hours Each)

This course will assist new CTE teachers in getting started as learning leaders and role models for their students. The course will help new teachers who are transitioning from their career fields into teaching gain a better understanding of CTE and their roles as educators. The course addresses various aspects of CTE, what it means to become a CTE teacher and where to find support in the first year, the importance of developing relationships with students, and keeping everyone safe! In addition, the course covers the terminology used in career and technology education and how those terms are applied in the field.
This course is based on ACTE Best Seller
Your First Year: 10 Things to Know | Published by NOCTI
This course builds on EC101 by providing five additional educational components that CTE teachers need to develop as professional educators. The course will review instructional processes, such as building career readiness, assessment and curriculum planning, developing engaging and interactive lessons for students, and instructional trends in CTE. Topics covered include competency development for students to assist CTE teachers in assessing their instructional effectiveness and student growth. Examples are shared that will provide new teachers with methods they can use to expand their instructional skills and engage their students.
This course is based on ACTE Best Seller
Your First Year: 10 Things to Know | Published by NOCTI
This course is designed to familiarize instructors with their roles and responsibilities in supporting students suffering from PTSD. The course provides an overview of how to recognize trauma, along with causes, types, and symptoms of students with either diagnosed or undiagnosed PTSD. The impact of physical and psychological trauma on learning is also explained. The course concludes with suggestions and strategies to guide instructors on how to create a trauma-sensitive classroom environment and provide supportive instructional opportunities.
All teachers should aim for maximum student engagement. To facilitate this happening requires an understanding and application of fundamental principles of effective instruction, especially in our new world of virtual learning. This engagement course is the first in a series designed to empower teachers to reach their highest levels of performance, digitally and in person. This course provides content and emphasizes the pedagogy, psychology, and neuroscience involved with engagement. The outcome for this course is to equip teachers to engage in deeper conversations about student learning, cognitive growth, and performance. This course provides engagement strategies to use in CTE courses immediately.
This course will provide an overview of career readiness including information and activities that may be incorporated into your courses. This course, which forms Part I of a two-part series, provides details about four specific career readiness skills: critical thinking/problem solving, verbal/written communications, teamwork/collaboration, and information technology applications. Additional thoughts and resources will also be provided to allow you to consider multiple ways to assist students in developing these skills in your courses.
This course will provide a brief review of career readiness and provide additional skills to incorporate into your courses. This course is Part II of a two (2) part series of courses. Therefore, this course will provide details about four (4) additional specific career readiness skills. These skills include leadership, professionalism/work ethic, career management, and global/multicultural fluency. Further thoughts and resources will also be provided to allow instructors to consider additional ways to incorporate these skills into their courses.
Professional Learning Communities (PLCs) provide systems of growth that can advance your teams and students to the next level. Typical CTE collaboration often revolves around content, limiting CTE teacher dialogue to specific career field discussions. With highly developed PLCs, teachers connect across program areas and the discussions shift to focus on instruction—not just content. PLCs provide a framework to make significant improvements in the quality of instruction. Teachers begin to speak a common language on strategies and lessons and engage in authentic field-testing and feedback. This course will discuss the organization of PLCs and strategies for participating in and benefiting from being a part of them.
This course is designed to provide Career and Technical instructors with an overview of how to support students at risk of suicide or who are influenced by suicide. Topics are designed to enhance awareness of risk factors and warning signs, increase sensitivity to stigma surrounding mental health emergencies and suicidality, and facilitate prevention through referral resources. Instructors will learn to identify signs and symptoms of at-risk students, while developing a deeper understanding of adolescent suicidal behaviors, especially those experienced by vulnerable populations. The course concludes with strategies to guide instructors on how and when to obtain appropriate assistance for students in crisis.
CTE teaching and learning have experienced considerable transformation since the COVID-19 pandemic began in March 2020. This course highlights lessons learned since CTE teaching transitioned to remote and hybrid models. We discuss the initial disruption phase, the challenges faced, and how CTE teachers have experienced success in developing their own remote lessons and learning experiences. The course examines five modes of delivery that have been successful and student supports needed to make this happen. Finally, the course looks to a future beyond 2020 to identify ways in which our practice will continue to transform during the 21st century Knowledge Age.
Positive psychology is the science of human flourishing and is leveraged to cultivate well-being for students, teachers, and staff in schools around the world. You'll be introduced to the tools of positive psychology to help you and your students thrive in the classroom and in life. This course is designed to help you understand the science of well-being and how to employ it for yourself and in educational settings to support well-being and academic achievement. The modules cover positive psychology's origins, and the research and application of the PERMA model, Character Strengths, and positive education.
This course is an overview of a variety of ways in which educators can infuse technology and web resources into every day curriculum, to engage learners and promote collaborative learning. A variety of resources and suggestions are contained within this course, allowing everyone from the novice to the technology expert to take away what is appropriate for them, their students, and the course, in order to integrate 21st century teaching resources and practices in a practical and beneficial manner.
While educators increasingly use technology in the lab setting, many don’t know where to start when trying to use it during didactic instruction. Furthermore, administrators have a hard time rolling out these initiatives. This course will go through the stages of a solid rollout plan to take advantage of available technologies. It will also discuss how to teach with technology as an enhancement to education, not a replacement. This course helps instructors, administrators and support staff to better understand how to use these tools.
This course covers the impact that personal electronic devices, in this case tablets, have on the delivery of instruction. The course discusses the reasons for using tablets in classroom and lab settings to enhance learning and expand educational resources for students. Strategies are given to enable instructors to see how the use of tablets can assist students in becoming active learners both within and outside of the school setting.
Students (both veterans and non-veterans) with Post Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) are enrolling in career education in increasingly larger numbers. Instructors need to have a basic understanding of what PTSD is and how it impacts the lives of students. This course covers what PTSD is and the characteristics that students with PTSD may display. In addition, Traumatic Brain Injury (TBI) is discussed as many students enrolling in career education have both PTSD and TBI. Instructional strategies to support the learning of students with PTSD and/or TBI will be discussed and examples given. Participants will also be given sources where they can gain additional insight into how to support the learning of students with PTSD and/or TBI.
Awareness about autism and the impact it has on the lives of those that have been diagnosed with it has grown greatly in the past few years. There has been an increase in enrollment of students who are on the autism spectrum in career education. This course will provide you with the characteristics of autism so that you will have an understanding of what autism is and how it impacts the learning of these students. Specific strategies for working with students who have been diagnosed as being on the autism spectrum will be provided, to enhance the engagement and learning success of students with autism.
Students with learning disabilities are enrolling in career education at increasing rates as a result of successful interventions and supports provided during their elementary and secondary schooling. This course describes the characteristics of students with learning disabilities and how having a learning disability impacts their learning process. As reading and comprehension is the essence of learning, it is important that instructors be knowledgeable in ways to support students with these learning challenges. Specific strategies for working with these students will be offered, to enhance the engagement and learning success of students with learning disabilities.
As students from different generations are enrolling in post-secondary settings today, instructors are presented with the challenge of how to engage, instruct and relate to these multigenerational learners. This course gives profiles of different generational learners and how they engage in the learning process. Content is shared on how to relate to learners of the different generations and how to use students’ life experiences as learning opportunities. As technology is an essential part of instructional delivery, strategies are given for building on the abilities of multigenerational students to use social networks, portable media (given the parameters of school policy), and personal interaction. In addition, instructors are given methods that can be used to help students develop the critical thinking and interpersonal skills needed for career success.
As previously homogenous communities become more diverse and the population of English language learners in educational institutions increases, educators need to provide services that give such learners opportunities for academic success equal to those provided to native English speakers. This course provides information about teaching English language learners, including the legal and cultural considerations instructors must take into account and ways to show respect for cultural differences and diversity. The course will explore the factors affecting how English language learners learn, and will provide strategies and techniques for instruction and motivation. This course will also cover how best to assess students for content-area knowledge and language proficiency.
Instructional planning and delivery is undergoing dynamic changes with the availability of technology and expanded avenues through which information can be provided. Instructors need to be aware of how they can expand their instructional formats to include the latest technology and learning theories. This course provides information about the different forms of learning and how they can be implemented into classrooms and laboratories. Other topics covered in the course include different strategies for learning including transformative and cooperative methods as well as collaborative and experiential methods that help to engage learners.
This course highlights the various ways in which learning can be more applied and integrated through the use of online instructional tools and environments. This is the case for all programs, including “hands-on” programs. The process of learning integration necessarily includes other steps in the process and these are explored in this course. These include expanding content, encouraging applied questioning, and analyzing implications. Throughout, the importance of online tools and environments are explored in relation to supporting more integrative and applied learning.
This course covers the different roles that culinary arts instructors play in the instructional process. The content provides rationale, strategies and methodologies that beginning as well as experienced culinary arts instructors can use in their classes and kitchens. Instructional best practices are discussed and examples given that will expand the knowledge base of culinary arts instructors as they prepare lessons. This course covers student centered instruction and information about the impact of student learning preferences on instructional planning and delivery.